When you have muscle spasms, you can try following nature treatment:

      1. Stretching
      2. Massage
      3. Ice
      4. Heat
      5. Drink Water
      6. Mild exercising

If your muscle spasms doesnot improve, we suggest you take some natural foods to relieve your muscle spasm.

Some OTC medicines and Prescription for muscle spasms

Nonprescription remedies

There are several things you can take by mouth that may help with your muscle spasms:

    • NSAIDs. Over-the-counter (OTC) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often bring relief by reducing inflammation and pain.
    • Pickle juice. Drinking a small amount of pickle juice reportedly relieves cramping muscles within 30 to 35 seconds. This is thought to work by restoring electrolyte balance.
    • Supplements. Salt tablets, vitamin B-12, and magnesium supplements are used by some people to treat and prevent muscle spasms. It’s important to note that there’s limited evidence to show that these are effective.
    • Natural muscle relaxers. Natural muscle relaxants include drinking chamomile tea, adding capsaicin to foods, and improving your sleep.

 

Prescription medication for Muscle Spasms

If you have a persisting muscle spasm, especially if it’s severe, your doctor may prescribe a muscle relaxant or a pain medication.

Muscle relaxants used for muscle spasms are called centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxants (SMRs), and are often only prescribed for 2- to 3-week periods.

A List of Skeletal muscle relaxants

 

Drug Name Reviews Avg. Ratings
Antiflex
Generic name: orphenadrine
1 review
  
10
Dantrium (Pro)
Generic name: dantrolene
2 reviews
  
10
Vanadom
Generic name: carisoprodol
1 review
  
9.0
Soma (Pro)
Generic name: carisoprodol
180 reviews
  
8.9
Zanaflex (Pro)
Generic name: tizanidine
100 reviews
  
7.7
Xeomin (Pro)
Generic name: incobotulinumtoxinA
2 reviews
  
7.5
Amrix (Pro)
Generic name: cyclobenzaprine
48 reviews
  
7.3
Myobloc (Pro)
Generic name: rimabotulinumtoxinB
3 reviews
  
7.2
Skelaxin (Pro)
Generic name: metaxalone
82 reviews
  
7.2
Lioresal (Pro)
Generic name: baclofen
20 reviews
  
6.8
Norflex (Pro)
Generic name: orphenadrine
22 reviews
  
6.5
Flexeril (Pro)
Generic name: cyclobenzaprine
197 reviews
  
6.3
Robaxin (Pro)
Generic name: methocarbamol
63 reviews
  
6.3
Lorzone (Pro)
Generic name: chlorzoxazone
21 reviews
  
6.2
Dysport (Pro)
Generic name: abobotulinumtoxinA
7 reviews
  
6.1
Botox (Pro)
Generic name: onabotulinumtoxinA
350 reviews
  
5.9
Parafon Forte DSC (Pro)
Generic name: chlorzoxazone
3 reviews
  
5.9
Fexmid (Pro)
Generic name: cyclobenzaprine
4 reviews
  
5.8
Gablofen (Pro)
Generic name: baclofen
3 reviews
  
5.8
Robaxin-750
Generic name: methocarbamol
39 reviews
  
5.6
Lioresal Intrathecal
Generic name: baclofen
3 reviews
  
5.2
Botox Cosmetic (Pro)
Generic name: onabotulinumtoxinA
11 reviews
  
4.9
Comfort Pac with Cyclobenzaprine
Generic name: cyclobenzaprine
2 reviews
  
4.5
Orfro
Generic name: orphenadrine
0 reviews
  
3.0
Kemstro
Generic name: baclofen
0 reviews
  
2.0
Dantrium Intravenous (Pro)
Generic name: dantrolene
0 reviews Add rating
Mio-Rel
Generic name: orphenadrine
0 reviews Add rating
Orphenate
Generic name: orphenadrine
0 reviews Add rating
Ozobax (Pro)
Generic name: baclofen
0 reviews Add rating
Paraflex
Generic name: chlorzoxazone
0 reviews Add rating
Remular-S
Generic name: chlorzoxazone
0 reviews Add rating
Revonto (Pro)
Generic name: dantrolene
0 reviews Add rating
Ryanodex (Pro)
Generic name: dantrolene
0 reviews Add rating

Although skeletal muscle relaxants are recommended for short-term use in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain, approximately 44.5% of users remain on them for more than a year.

Due to CNS depression, cyclobenzaprine, metaxalone, orphenadrine (Norflex, others), methocarbamol (Robaxin, others), carisoprodol, and chlorzoxazone (Lorzone, Parafon Forte DSC, others) are on the American Geriatrics Society’s Beers List of inappropriate drugs for elderly patients.

Despite this, approximately 300,000 annual prescriptions for skeletal muscle relaxants (15%) are issued to patients older than 65 years of age.

Skeletal muscle relaxants represent a diverse pharmacotherapeutic group of medications across several chemical classes that are structurally dissimilar. These agents are effective for spasticity, skeletal muscle spasms, or both.

Because of the breadth of pharmacologic mechanisms and variable pharmacokinetics, the drugs have a huge range of AEs and potential drug interactions.

Considering that these agents are most often used in the elderly and also as adjuvants for the treatment of chronic pain patients with multiple comorbidities who are likely receiving a polypharmaceutical regimen (including opioids), skeletal muscle drug selection for each patient requires careful attention to these factors.

 

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